Subaru of America, Inc.
Title Sponsor of the
2005 Annual Meeting

Premeeting Field Trips

1. Neoproterozoic Uinta Mountain Group of Northeastern Utah: Pre-Sturtian Geographic, Tectonic, and Biologic Evolution [401] — FULL
Thurs.–Fri., 13–14 Oct. Cosponsored by GSA Sedimentary Geology Division.
Carol M. Dehler, Dept. of Geology, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84321, +1-435-797-0764, fax +1-435-797-1588; Susannah Porter; Doug Sprinkel.
This trip will focus on the stratigraphy, sedimentology, isotope geochemistry, and paleontology of the siliciclastic Neoproterozoic (pre-Sturtian) Uinta Mountain Group. We will examine deposits representing offshore marine to fan-delta to fluvial environments and contemplate how these rocks fit into the picture of Rodinia break up, severe climate changes, and biologic evolution of the Neoproterozoic era.
Max.: 27; min.: 12. Cost: US$185 (2L, R, 1ON, vans).
This field trip is in conjunction with the Pocatello Formation and Overlying Strata, Southeastern Idaho: Snowball Earth Diamictites, Cap Carbonates, and Neoproterozoic Isotopic Profiles field trip held Sat., 15 Oct.
2. Basaltic Volcanism of the Central and Western Snake River Plain and its Relation to the Yellowstone Plume [402] — FULL
Thurs.–Sat., 13–15 Oct.
John Shervais, Dept. of Geology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322, +1-435-797-1274, fax +1-435-797-1588; John Kauffman; Kurt Othberg; Virginia Gillerman.
Volcanic features at the intersection of the central and western Snake River Plain include subaerial and hydrovolcanic vents, pillow lava deltas, plagioclase flotation cumulates in ferrobasalt, and water escape structures in massive lava flows. Other features include stratigraphic relationships with rhyolites and lake sediments, unconformities in the older basalts, and the effects of the great Bonneville flood.
Max.: 22; min.: 12. Cost: US$325 (3L, R, 2ON, vans).
3. From Cirques to Canyon Cutting: New Quaternary Research in the Uinta Mountains [403] — FULL
Thurs.–Sat., 13–15 Oct. Cosponsored by GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division.
Jeffrey Munroe, Geology Dept., Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT 05753, +1-802-443-3446, fax +1-802-443-2072; Joel Pederson; Benjamin Laabs; Eric Carson.
This trip will tour the north and south flanks of the Uinta Mountains and sections of the Green River. Subjects will include glacial and fluvial geomorphology, new constraints on the timing of the local Last Glacial Maximum, dynamics of late Pleistocene glaciations, post-glacial adjustments of alpine fluvial systems, as well as paleoflooding, canyon cutting, and integration of the Green River.
Max.: 30; min.: 14. Cost: US$255 (3L, 1D, R, 2ON, vans).
4. Geomorphology and Rates of Landscape Change in the Fremont River Drainage, Northwestern Colorado Plateau [404]
Thurs.–Sat., 13–15 Oct. — Canceled.
 
5. Ice in Equatorial Pangea: The Unaweep-Cutler System [405]
Thurs.–Sat., 13–15 Oct. — Withdrawn.
 
6. Lacustrine Records of Laramide Landscape Evolution, Green River Formation [406] — FULL
Thurs.–Sat., 13–15 Oct. Cosponsored by GSA Limnogeology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division.
Alan Carroll, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, +1-608-262-2368, fax +1-608-262-0693; Paul Buchheim; Arvid Aase.
The Green River Formation contains a relatively complete and highly resolved record of the geomorphic evolution of the surrounding landscape. This trip will examine the utility of lake basins for interpreting past orogenic and geomorphic processes and will also provide an introduction to the sedimentology and stratigraphy of large lake systems. A collecting stop for fossil fish is also planned.
Max.: 33; min.: 10. Cost: US$340 (3B, 3L, 1D, R, 2ON, vans).
7. Late Cretaceous Stratigraphy, Depositional Environments, and Macrovertebrate Paleontology in Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument, Utah [407] — FULL
Thurs.–Sat., 13–15 Oct. Cosponsored by GSA Geobiology and Geomicrobiology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division.
Alan L. Titus, Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument, 190 E. Center Street, Kanab, UT 84741, +1-435-644-4332, fax +1-435-644-4350; John D. Powell; Eric Roberts; Stonnie Pollock; Jim Kirkland; L. Barry Albright.
Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument contains one of the most continuous records of Late Cretaceous terrestrial biota in North America. This record occurs in a spectacular 2000+ meter thick foreland basin sequence deposited in a coastal plain setting. Recent finds in the monument include dinosaur skeletons with soft tissue preservation and several new species of larger vertebrates. This trip will provide an overview of the region’s Cretaceous geology and paleontology, emphasizing findings of the Bureau of Land Management–sponsored research.
Max.: 36; min.: 12. Cost: US$220 (3L, R, 2ON vans).
8. Transect across the Northern Walker Lane, Northwest Nevada and Northeast California: An Incipient Transform Fault along the Pacific–North American Plate Boundary [408] — FULL.
Thurs.–Sat., 13–15 Oct. Cosponsored by GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
James E. Faulds, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, MS 178, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, +1-775-784-6691, ext. 159, fax +1-775-784-1709; Christopher D. Henry; Nicholas H. Hinz.
The northern Walker Lane is one of the youngest and least developed parts of the Pacific–North American transform boundary and thus offers insight into how strike-slip fault systems develop. This trip will assess the geometry and kinematics of this curiously left-stepping, dextral fault system and view spectacular exposures of tuff-filled Oligocene paleovalleys that constrain offset on the strike-slip faults.
Max.: 29; min.: 12. Cost: US$285 (3L, 1D, R, 3ON, vans). Begins and ends in Reno.
9. Brittle Deformation, Fluid Flow, and Diagenesis in Sandstone at Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada [409]
Fri.–Sat., 14–15 Oct. — Canceled.
 
10. Evolution of a Miocene-Pliocene Supradetachment Basin, Northeastern Great Basin [410] — FULL
Sat., Oct. 15. Cosponsored by GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Alexander Steely, Dept. of Geology, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84321, +1-435-797-1273, fax +1-435-797-1588; Susanne Janecke; Stephanie Carney; Sean Long; Robert Oaks, Jr.
The Miocene-Pliocene Bannock detachment system in southeastern Idaho provides a unique opportunity to examine evidence for fault formation and slip at low angles along low-angle normal faults, flat-on-flat geometries, and changes in structural style across a lateral ramp. We will also examine evidence for the stratigraphic evolution of the supradetachment basin and its later disruption by Basin-and-Range normal faults.
Max.: 25; min.: 12. Cost: US$95 (1L, R, vans).
11. Geology and Natural Burning Coal Fires of the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale, Emery Coalfield, Utah [411] — FULL
Sat., 15 Oct. Cosponsored by GSA Coal Geology Division.
Glenn B. Stracher, East Georgia College, Swainsboro, GA 30401, +1-478-289-2073, fax +1-478-289-2080; Paul B. Anderson; David E. Tabet; Janet L. Stracher.
On this trip we will travel to the Emery coalfield in central Utah where we will examine and discuss the structural geology and coal stratigraphy of the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale, visit actively burning natural coal fires, and gain hands-on experience with data collecting techniques for mine fires research. Subsidence features, gas vents, and ground fissures associated with Utah’s coal fires will be observed.
Max.: 36; min.: 12. Cost: US$90 (1L, 1D, R, vans).
12. Latest Pleistocene–Early Holocene Human Occupation in the Bonneville Basin [412] — FULL
Sat., 15 Oct. Cosponsored by GSA Archaeological Geology Division.
David Rhode, Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV 89512, +1-775-673-7310, fax +1-775-673-7397; Ted Goebel; Bryan Hockett; Kevin Jones; David Madsen.
This excursion visits archaeological cave sites and paleoenvironmental localities in the western Bonneville Basin that give a detailed picture of human occupation and environmental change during the terminal Pleistocene and early Holocene. Danger Cave and Bonneville Estates Rockshelter contain the earliest well-dated evidence of human occupation in the region. Post-pluvial environmental change is highlighted at Blue Lakes, an expansive marshland adjacent to the Great Salt Lake Desert.
Max.: 48; min.: 12. Cost: US$75 (1L, R, vans).
13. Neotectonics and Paleoseismology of the Wasatch Fault, Utah [413] — FULL
Sat., 15 Oct. Cosponsored by GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Ronald L. Bruhn, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, +1-801-581-6619, fax +1-801-581-8219; Ronald Harris; William R. Lund; Christopher DuRoss.
The trip will highlight recent research on the neotectonics and paleoseismology of the Wasatch fault zone, one of the world’s foremost sites for developing techniques to investigate the earthquake history and rupturing properties of normal faulting. We will visit segment-boundaries, fault scarps and bedrock exposures on the Great Salt Lake and Provo segments, and a new paleoseismology trench on the Nephi fault segment.
Max.: 40; min.: 12. Cost: US$70 (1L, R, bus).
14. Pocatello Formation and Overlying Strata, Southeastern Idaho: Snowball Earth Diamictites, Cap Carbonates, and Neoproterozoic Isotopic Profiles [414] — FULL
Sat., 15 Oct. Cosponsored by GSA Sedimentary Geology Division.
Paul Link, Dept. of Geosciences, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209, +1-208-282-3846, fax +1-208-282-4414; Frank Corsetti; Nathaniel Lorentz.
This trip will traverse two Neoproterozoic sections in the Portneuf Narrows area, southeastern Idaho, requiring climbs of 800 and 400 ft. Sections are Scout Mountain Member, Pocatello Formation, including ca. Ma 710 glacial diamictites, dolomite cap, 667 Ma tuff, and upper caplike carbonate; and cyclic Blackrock Canyon Limestone, with upward-shallowing siliciclastic to carbonate cycles and microbial mounds.
Max.: 30; min.: 10. Cost: US$80 (1L, R, vans).
This field trip is in conjunction with the Neoproterozoic Uinta Mountain Group of Northeastern Utah: Pre-Sturtian Geographic, Tectonic, and Biologic Evolution field trip held Thurs.–Fri., 13–14 Oct.

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© 2005 The Geological Society of America