How to Apply

Apply here through the online form. The application deadline passed on 1 February 2019.

Eligibility details:

  • Students currently enrolled in a research-focused graduate degree program at an accredited college or university in the United States or its territories.
  • Students may only receive one AGeS grant during their graduate degree (MSc or PhD). Preference will be given to students who have not received a previous AGeS award.
  • Students may submit one AGeS proposal per funding cycle.

 

Deadline: Passed on 1 February 2019

Typical amount of award: ~$8,300 (maximum of $10,000)

Estimated number of awards: 18–20 per year in 2019, 2020, 2021

AGeS geochronology labs

Any lab in the United States or its territories can participate. Click here for the list of AGeS labs. If you are interested in working with a lab who is not yet part of the AGeS lab network, please encourage the lab to join the program. Labs can support up to 4 proposals in a given application cycle.

Types of projects supported by AGeS2

Unlike AGeS1 projects, AGeS2 projects are not restricted to North American locations. AGeS2 supports projects that fall under the scope of the broader science supported by the Division of Earth Sciences of the National Science Foundation, which is aimed at "... improving the understanding of the structure, composition, and evolution of the Earth, the life it supports, and the processes that govern the formation and behavior of the Earth's materials."

Funding

Funded grants must be completely expensed within one year of the award.

How to initiate an AGeS proposal

Students wishing to submit an AGeS proposal are responsible for initiating contact with an AGeS lab to propose a project and discuss potential timelines. If the lab director feels that this is a mutually beneficial opportunity, the lab will help the student refine and clarify their proposed research and provide a support letter for this specific project. Note that labs are under no obligation to collaborate on a project if approached by a student.

Because one of the goals of this program is to foster new research collaborations, students may not request funds to work in labs they are already associated with, including labs managed or directed by their project supervisor(s).

Proposal Preparation

Proposals must include the following, use the following format, and fit within the stated character limits (character limits include spaces). Incomplete proposals will not be considered.

Project Description

  • Project Title
  • Project supervisor at home institution
  • AGeS lab and lab director
  • State the geoscience question or hypothesis that this project will address. (Up to 1200 characters).
  • Discuss the importance of the proposed study. (Up to 2500 characters).
  • Briefly explain the relevance of your project to NSF-EAR science goals, which are aimed at "...improving the understanding of the structure, composition, and evolution of the Earth, the life it supports, and the processes that govern the formation and behavior of the Earth's materials" – NSF-GEO Website. (Up to 500 characters).
  • Proposed work. Concisely state your research plan and how it will answer the question or test the hypothesis outlined above. (Up to 2500 characters).
  • Brief timeline (up to 500 characters)
  • Figure(s) with caption(s). At least one figure is required, but the figure(s) should occupy no more than one page.
  • References Cited.
  • Available funds. Please explain if you currently have any funds available for the proposed geochronology work, or if your project is unlikely to occur without AGeS support. (up to 500 characters, including spaces).
  • Detailed budget and budget justification. Budgets may include funds for travel to and from the AGeS lab where you propose to work, food and lodging while visiting the lab, analytical and training fees, equipment or consumables required for analysis, and sample preparation fees (including mineral separation accomplished at another facility if necessary). Requested budgets may not exceed $10,000 per proposal. Lab fees will be paid directly from Arizona State University to the laboratory.
  • Explain what geochronology opportunities you already have through your existing thesis research. Be specific. (Up to 500 characters).
  • Explain the extent to which this project represents a new collaboration with the host geochronology lab. Has your advisor’s research group previously interacted or collaborated with this lab? Be specific. (Up to 500 characters).

Additional Required Documents

  • Provide the URL to the lab profile of the collaborating AGeS lab. The profiles for all participating labs can be found here.
  • Upon submission of your proposal, a request will be sent to your project supervisor at your home institution for a letter of support. This letter should: (1) comment briefly on the significance and feasibility of the proposed research; (2) describe the skills and capability of the student; (3) explain the advisor’s level of engagement in the project; (4) explain the extent to which this project will represent an opportunity for the student to gain hands-on geochronology experience otherwise not available to the student; and (5) explain the extent to which this project will represent a new collaboration with the host geochronology lab. (Up to 5000 characters.)
  • Upon submission of your proposal, a request will be sent to the collaborating AGeS lab for a letter of support. The lab letter should explain: 1) the significance and feasibility of the proposed research, 2) the lab’s level of interest in this project, and 3) the extent to which this project will represent a new collaboration. (Up to 2500 characters.)

See the list of AGeS1 awardees.

Assessment

To better assess the program activity and outcomes, we are carrying out several surveys that are required of all funded students and labs, as well as potentially of applicants that were not funded. Responses to these assessments are essential for evaluating the overall effectiveness of the program. The results are being used to improve the program and will be a factor in NSF's decision whether to continue supporting it in the future.

Application Tips

Refer to GSA's Graduate Student Research Grants page for tips on preparing a strong research grant proposal. (Keep in mind that each program has its own requirements; but many of these tips will be useful.) Before submitting your proposal, make sure you proofread your work thoroughly for grammar, punctuation, style, completeness, and overall presentation.

AGeS awardee Jaime Delano (WWU) collecting luminescence samples for her AGeS project.

AGeS awardee Jaime Delano (WWU) collecting luminescence samples for her AGeS project.